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NTSB Issues 7 Safety Recommendations to FAA related to Ongoing Lion Air, Ethiopian Airlines Crash Investigations

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The National Transportation Safety Board issued seven safety recommendations Thursday to the Federal Aviation Administration, calling upon the agency to address concerns about how multiple alerts and indications are considered when making assumptions as part of design safety assessments. (www.ntsb.gov) Altro...

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CAH747
CLARENCE HELLER 4
I was a 17 year 747 pilot 12 as capt. When I went overseas to fly. Was almost down checked 'cause I hand flew IFR into JFK. "Use auto connections, co paid for them, use 'em". I will not look down on new pilots, but suggest companies make them use simulator time w/o auto much more than every 6 months.
siriusloon
siriusloon 4
We haven't heard much about single-pilot or no-human-pilot airliners for a while, so at least some good has come out of the MAX mess.
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
I agree.... I was wondering about that.
s20609
s20609 3
Considering the NTSB recommendations regarding assumptions made by pilots, more recently Certified Aircraft introduce Automation and Pilot management tools that were not available during the original 737 Certification. Given the dramatic increase in Flight Systems automation, I recommend an additional Certification Process for old aircraft that have added modern automation into older Pilot Managed aircraft. The investigation of the 737 MAX accidents suggest the flight crew depending upon automation rather than disabling the faulty system.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
Just thinking out loud, with all the automation and so forth.. Especially in CAT III a/c, crews do not get enough stick time. Sure crews get to fly the simulator... but it seems like a good thing to have the crews to have to fly a minimum amount of time hands on no Auto Pilot... Even if not in RVSM airspace... I remember a had to defer an autopilot system and the captain thanked me, because he said he does not get enough time flying.... His FO told him.. You can have the first and long leg! - We all laughed and all was good.
yr2012
matt jensen 4
Y'all need to fly an old L188 to appreciate all your automation.
s20609
s20609 2
Help me with this positive arrow.
airuphere
airuphere 1
So true - I just saw a video about the airline that runs a 737-200 Combi from Montreal to Artic for a Gold Mine and the only auto they have is ALT hold .. no auto throttle etc.. totally different world
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
Most of the older 737-200's were equiped with PMS (Performance management System) and it does much the same as the Auto Throttle with 1 huge difference. It in no way connects or interfaces to the Autopilot. It was designed to Manage the throttles more fuel efficient. To my knowledge, all the 200 basics and advanced had this system until they came out with the CatIII version of the 200 Advanced.

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