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  • 31

The radio navigation planes use to land safely is insecure and can be hacked

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Like many technologies built in earlier decades, the ILS was never designed to be secure from hacking. Radio signals, for instance, aren’t encrypted or authenticated. Using a $600 software defined radio, the researchers can spoof airport signals in a way that causes a pilot’s navigation instruments to falsely indicate a plane is off course. (arstechnica.com) Altro...

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ThinkingGuy
ThinkingGuy 10
As I recall, this was a plot point in "Die Hard 2" (1990), just without the "software defined" part of the radio.
williambaker08
In die hard 2 they knew were the under ground wires were and took over the airport that way. They also put a device in baggage to listen to airport chatter. What this article is saying is that they can hack a radio frequency without tapping into the wires.
rds24a
and Spiderman: Homecoming
JJ7
JJ Johnson 5
GPS and RNAV cross check. If PIREP indicates fluctuating or unreliable ILS signal issue NOTAM and use GPS and RNAV. My next question is the FAA has significant ground based monitors that will shut off the ILS if the signal is compromised. In a CAT 3 ILS that shutoff is measured in milliseconds. If the spoof also impacts the ground based monitors it will shut off the ILS signal. Lesson Learned? Don't put all your ILS eggs in one basket REDUNDANCY REDUNDANCY REDUNDANCY !!
jorzecho
Dude, that why you verify with GPS as well as morse code.
Highflyer1950
Funny story. Back in the late 70’s, early 80’s I had just memorized the morse code and could do maybe 35 letters a minute. So the first time airborne eager to show off my newly learned skill, I tuned in 116.4 and was ready to listen and then.......loud and clear, a voice said Buffalo VOR.......so much for learning morse?
GolfrGuy7
GolfrGuy7 1
I saw no mention in the article of the attacker spoofing the localizer identifier. That's the entire reason the identifier exists - so we are certain that we have a valid signal dialed in.
Highflyer1950
yup, and pretty hard to spoof that H.U.D. along with infrared camera information, if equipped?
paulgilpin1953
when elon musk is brought in to do the final "FIX" on the 737 MAX, we'll get a true autopilot.
ianmcdonell
Oh heck - there is a monster under the bed
Cansojr
Cansojr -3
How can we defeat the ILS tampering. Would a microwave landing system defeat the interference on conventional MLS Microwave Landind system. It is also more accurate than the current 50s technology on the ILS.
bovineone
Probably the trend will be to encourage deployment of GBAS, which allows for precision GPS approaches with a secondary ground-based signal that is used to validate the accuracy of the position.

Cansojr
Cansojr -3
Thanks for clearing that up Jeff.
xtoler
Larry Toler -7
I was flying to KSTL from KCLT on UsAirways for recurrent F/A training back in April of '05. Even though most our EMBRAER 145's was full glass cockpits, I'm taking us all out with the flip phone I had at the time. LOL, I was flying in civilian clothes and had my line badge hidden. This F/A gave me a rash... Briefed me about having my cell phone on before we started ti even block out of the gate. I flashed my FAA/SITA badge and said I was okay.
jmilleratp
SIDA badge. And, it's issued by the airport authority, not the FAA. No wonder why you had issues.

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