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Off-Duty Bomber Pilot Helps Land a United 737 After Captain Passes Out

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At that moment, Gongol thought it was a medical emergency with a first class passenger, his instincts told him to stay seated and stay out of the way. A fourth call went out, "are there any non-revenue pilots on board, please ring your call button." Immediately, Gongol realized the pilot was the patient. He looked to his wife; as she gave him a nod, Gongol pressed his button and headed toward the flight deck. (www.afspc.af.mil) Altro...

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airbus321
Tom Pawlesh 34
No mention of the FO's name. Gongol did nothing but assist the FO, she is the real hero.
cm5299
Chuck Me 6
I agree. But it's a military paper and the subject of the article was a "local" guy. So understand why he was the focus.
btweston
btweston 4
Ditto what Chuck Me said. Cool story, though.
sparkie624
sparkie624 4
Agreed, He was only support... Even states she hand flew the approach...
airbus321
Tom Pawlesh 15
Have you ever noticed some FO's wear 4 stripes. They were captain have been bumped back to the right seat due to furloughs. All FO's at my airline are type rated as captain. Media thinks FO's are in training or something, even my neighbor has asked me if I could land the plane if I had to. Gee, I don't know, I'm just an FO.
preacher1
preacher1 5
The other thing too that people must realize now on 121 carriers, all cockpit crew must have 1500 hrs and ATP. They may be gaining time in type or just waiting on the Captain slot to come around but they ain't no rookie.
socalchatname714
Low time pilots at the major is a misconception. My United class average was 6500 hours. I was the highest at 11,000 hours.
NCDesq
NCDesq 1
Do Capts and FO's take turns landing the plane?
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
Sometimes it depends on the weather... In the case of SWA a CAT III landing can only be done by certified captains. Their program requires HUD which is only on the captains side, therefore, if he has 2 days of CAT III landings then the captain must do all of them.... That much and extreme weather is rare. Other than REQUIRED HUD when only on the captains side, they do swap duties.
Doobs
Dee Lowry 2
Yes. They usually do alternate unless told otherwise by the PIC.
gunfitr
Of course they do.
cblair0608
cblair0608 1
People really think the FO is just there to assist the captain and have little flying skills. That time the captain died in flight the news crews were all over the landing airport cause everyone really thought the 777 would crash due to the FO flying it. It was comical really.
MANBOI
MANBOI 1
Line check airman?
Toes2
Gpa Tipton 6
33 yrs commercial Cap here_ maybe 9,000 or so on 737.
.
Have flown lots of legs solo due to brain-dead F/O.
.
Nonetheless_Official Attaboys to F/O & Military guy
.
btw_ None of the gals I flew with would give a sh8t about being awarded an Attaboy
instead of an AttaGirl_ They just liked being pilots.
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
LOL.. Brain Dead and Unconscious is two different things...

Working maintenance, I have worked with a lot of brain dead captains...
Toes2
Gpa Tipton 1
haha_ Good one_btw_I luuuuuv'ed+++!!!*** you guys_Having no idea what happened except that when I pushed the throttles forward the airplane went faster_This probably confirms everything you guys thought about pilots.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
I remember once working as a maintenance I had a captain to call in with an ATO at 140 kts. The FO was flying, captain called rotate and FO did not. Captain thought it was a flight control problem and aborted..... When talking to the captain, the reason for the abort was "Cockpit Communication". The FO admitted to hearing the rotate, but it did not register for some reason.

As a precaution and for legal reasons, we had a mechanic to check the a/c. Everything checked out including flight control and cockpit interphone.... I guess you could use this as an FO Brain Dead Example.

I later told the captain I am glad he had plenty of runway.... He said: "Me Too!"
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 5
He looked at his wife, and she nodded yes. What if she had nodded no...
joelwiley
joel wiley 6
..she would probably meant I can't believe after all this time you'd be such an idiot as to not help when needed.
Moviela
He IS a pilot, so he does wear the pants in the family, but his wife picks them out for him.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
No worries - you can't nod "no" lol.
nasdisco
Chris B 5
In this hours the work load of co.pilot goes to maximum, stress and an medical emergency real, so hard!!! Congratulations FO, good job.
jimcander
"She had never taxied a 737 before..."

Uh, really??? REALLY??? A great "story" but in my estimation it's a poor representation of the facts. It paints the FO as a poor little girl saved by the heroic bomber pilot... piffle...
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
737's don't have tillers on the FO's side! But you would have think she would have tried in a simulator at least once.
jimcander
Did she say "I've never taxied a 737." or "I can't taxi a 737 from this side, you'll have to help." BIG difference.
RobertH52
The story indicates the FO moved over to the captains seat, I think. Maybe I read it wrong.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
They swapped seats.. Maybe that was why... If she had never taxied, I think it is pretty safe to say she had seen the captain do it at least once.
preacher1
preacher1 1
That's just it. She never said anything that was directly quoted in the story. The quote came from him, slightly embellished, I think.
preacher1
preacher1 3
Well, she asked where to taxi as she never had been to KOMA before, and if she was a true FO, she may never have. While tillers on both sides are an option, most 121's just have then on the left side. Even on legs that FO flies, the Captain taxi's to the runway and then to the gate when they get back down.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 2
I don't understand why questioning where to taxi. I've never been to Moscow, but I'll just follow ATC instructions and the taxi chart.
preacher1
preacher1 3
Well, that is a weird one. It looks like she would have been in touch with UAL dispatch as far as the diversion, and unless I am mistaken, UAL has a presence at KOMA
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
She probably did contact dispatch (if she had time), Just because UAL flies into KOMA does not mean that she has flown into that station. Looking at their flights in and out of KOMA, they only have 2 737 flights per day, the others are regionals.
MANBOI
MANBOI 1
All the other obstacles aside, it was an emergency involving her Captain who was sitting next to her when he fell ill.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 1
It's so easy, even a pilot could do it...
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 2
I meant mechanic...
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
Turning the steering wheel as pilots would call it is easy.. Just ask for a progressive taxi and good to go. No Problem...

I remember a conversation that I had with a pilot at one time.

capt: we are good to go.
me: Captain, that problem is not defer-able.
capt: why not we are willing to take the plane.
me: Sir, the plane is not Airworthy!
capt: I can handle it.
me: Captain, would you want to choose your mountain top so that I can have rescue ready

That was a true conversation between me (maint control) and a captain full of pax).
Niggle88
Ever been to LFPG/CDG? `If you have never been lost in CDG you haven't been there!'.
jimcander
So you're seriously telling me you feel the statement, "She had never taxied a 737 before" is accurate? Accurate. No, well if this or that. If the tiller is on the left, then the writer did a disservice to the FO by making this statement. If you want what if's I can guarantee she'd taxied a 737 in the sim...
preacher1
preacher1 2
If you read the story closely you will see that quote and statement came from Gongol, not the FO herself. All she said prior to that was asking him if he knew where to taxi, that she had never been to KOMA, nothing from her about never having taxied one. He also said they had not informed ATC that the pilot was the reason for the Emergency. She never said anything about not taxiing one. I must agree with you that she was totally qualified if she was sitting in the right seat. I stand by my statement that she may never have taxied one in real life. I am sure she did in the SIM.
jimcander
"Surprisingly, taxiing was the most stressful part of the day for the first officer," said Gongol. "She had never taxied a 737 before and the ATC had no idea that the pilot was the reason for the emergency. We had to make a quick decision that her switching to the pilot's seat and taxiing the aircraft without the training was necessary to save the captain's life."

I stand by my statement that this is poor writing. It's very easy to take what the facts were, attribute quotes and give credit.

When you write and especially report, even if it's for the base paper accuracy is paramount to everything else.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Well said and to me there is a big difference in him saying it and her being quoted. I think she did a fine job. I can't say that it is easy but that tiller can be accessed from the FO side although difficult. As I said it is an option; our 767 and all previous aircraft have it. There is only 1 on our CRJ but it was way too expensive for a retrofit.
KenWD0ELQ
I read the comment as "I've never taxied here at Omaha before". I GUARANTEE that somewhere in her training, she's taxied a 737 around. Quite understandable that the FO might figure that a SAC bomber pilot might have taxied around the Omaha airport. He's certainly been stationed at Offutt before...
MANBOI
MANBOI 1
Airline FO's don't taxi, that's the Capt's responsibility and job as the tiller is on Capt's side. It's the Capt's job to taxi out and line up on the correct runway backed up by the FO. If the FO is flying that leg they take over on the runway and relinquish control back to Capt on roll out. Its common for airline pilots to alternate flying every other flight. In corp world our pilots actually trade seats and usually alternate each flying day but they also fly a lot less than airline pilots in total hours and hours/day.

[This comment has been downvoted. Show anyway.]

AWAAlum
AWAAlum 4
If you read between the lines that she was "scared shit-less" old military guy, you'd best run down to your nearest optometrist.
Richardols
Apparently you're also a senile old military guy.
mhlansdell00
Damn, I missed that quote by either of them, I can think of several reasons for her to be anxious, none of which have much to do with her experience or currency. He was the author and she was the pilot who assumed the job as pic. He volunteered as her "assistant pilot' who I doubt had any currency in a 73 other than a pax. Oh, and yes, we shouldn't forget that maybe she and the and the disabled pic. might have had a professional relationship and codependency shared in the cockpit. Maybe she was just a little worried that her friend and partner's life was in jeopardy, they weren't flying an hospital CCU and he wasn't going to get better until he was at least deplaned and put in the hands of the fire department.
mhlansdell00
I too am getting a littlle disgusted that I can't have a simple conversation without a poliical element being slid in and changing the topic. I'm not fond of the current policies being touted by the admin. Maybe we can change that in November. Until then we can only encourage better men to challenge the needed jobs.
preacher1
preacher1 2
I don't care for Obummer either but may I ask where in the Sam Hill this comment came from, having no real bearing on any thing to do with this story.
Bernie20910
I just wonder why they needed to specify that the bomber pilot was off-duty. It's not like he's going to be on-duty sitting in the cabin of a 737. They're notoriously deficient of ordnance and hardpoints after all.
Joyschtik
Sal Milano 4
Journalist are dickheads. FO saved the day assisted by the flight attendants, Gongol, ATC etc
ADXbear
ADXbear 4
Awesome job, clear thinking good to see aviators using their skills to make a happy ending for all including the captain, recover well sir.. the FO did a great job..
Niggle88
Sounds like a very well handled event to a happy conclusion all round. This allows me to say on a lighter note that in my various Airlines' (F27,F28,B737,7B47) `Crew Incapacitation' Checklists, there were always a few unwritten immediate actions for Captain Incapacitation.

1: Establish real `Incapacitation' (Can be very hard to tell with some Skippers!).
2: Restrain away from controls and call for assistance from crew.
3: Start a stopwatch; Most important! It's all Command time from now on!
4 Upon arrival of assistance, The Command words are `Help me get this Dead/Sick/Grumpy B...... out of MY seat!'.
5: Decide on the level of resuscitation/care you wish applied to said Skipper (This will depend on your respective positions on the Seniority list, personal likes/dislikes/morality should not be allowed to interfere with this crucial decision. If unsure, the default is `Minimal'!
Written with tongue firmly in cheek well done both, and of course Cabin Crew. It looks like they handled their end excellently.
^ Get on with flying `Your' Aeroplane!

As an aside, any help is good help, our senior CC were trained in basic checklist use, and a PPL with 200 Hrs has invaluable knowledge of checklists, Radio Procs, Swithchery Flap/Gear selection etc. which would be invaluable. If you don't know the Airfield, ASK, a follow-me will be eagerly provided by our ATC colleagues!

[This poster has been suspended.]

[This poster has been suspended.]

[This poster has been suspended.]

THRUSTT
THRUSTT 2
Work those damn feet on the pedals Phil, taildragger style...

[This poster has been suspended.]

THRUSTT
THRUSTT 1
I'm not opposed to change, but compared to a lot of todays ways of doing things, you just can't beat old school. Phil's taking us to the hoop!!!
mhlansdell00
I had an acquaintance on the Miami to London route for AAL. He was in fact, their oldest FO at the time. According to him, if he stepped up to captain, he would loose his seniority and his choice assignments. Don't blame him, he was also a sail-boater on the Chesapeake Bay. :)
gruffinb
Never miss an opportunity to keep your mouth shut.
Doobs
Dee Lowry 3
Great story but why didn't the F/O declare an emergency? And as far as not knowing where to taxi...what about assistance from ground control or UAL dispatch? Too much info missing in this article. But "kudos" go out to the whole flight crew and Gongol for being on the same page in this emergency situation. CRM definitely was in position...even with Gongol.
preacher1
preacher1 2
Unless I am mistaken, this was written by a military newspaper, with emphasis on the actions of an off duty military pilot on board. Hence we seem to be lacking a lot of info on the FO/temporary captain's actions. That said, she did a heck of a job but then again, she did what she was trained to do.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
To be sure, I reread the article...it's stated that ATC didn't know that the Captain was the emergency which sounds as though it was a known emergency, but not that one significant detail.
georgegreen177
If true, the FO made one huge mistake. She did not tell ATC the real nature of the emergency. As stated in the article ATC had no idea the real emergency. There should have been enough response vehicles out there that they wouldn't have to taxi anywhere.
preacher1
preacher1 2
I saw that and have a hard time with it. ATC generally needs to know the nature of the emergency when clearing for the diversion. That said, they may have just told them medical emergency and not elaborated but even with that, there should have been a response of some type.
mhlansdell00
If she had used the term medical emergency, I would think that at a facility that size EMTs would be right there on the runway. Maybe a turn off the active, but that's all I'd expect.
Doobs
Dee Lowry 2
It's all about the drama! Journalists think they know what went on and they often have misled the public. Don't judge the PIC. Beit the F/O or Captain. The F/O happened to be a woman, who happened to be in a situation where she was the PIC
. I wonder what people would say if she were a man???
mhlansdell00
I missed the media bent. Fact is, this pilot did just what she was trained to do and has been doing for some years, my bet. The B-1 pilot expedited the landing by functioning as the F/O or co=pilot. AF pilots may have different ways of doing things but they are still familiar with check lists and VHF radios. The object of the exercise was to put the aircraft on the ground as quickly as practicable with all nuts, bolts , all SOB in tact and in position and to get emergency medical help for the stricken PIC. Due to her presence, skills, experience and currency she was able to put a loaded 73 safely on the runway without the need for even an inspection. In other words, she's a pilot
sparkie624
sparkie624 5
In other words.. She did her job with skill and professionalism... What else can you ask for.
mhlansdell00
You bet. It's the single thing I want from the pilot, train engineer, ships captain, or bus driver driving what ever I'm on whether as crew or passenger. As for where to taxi, ground should have been all over that. New headline " UAL Flight Lands Safely". How mundane.
Doobs
Dee Lowry 2
Agree with you Mark. Although, I question the purpose of the article. Situations like this happen all the time. This made the news because the F/O was a woman. It's pretty obvious to me. Now if the F/O was a man...I don't think we would be having this conversation. Must have been a slow day in the Aviation world. It's about sensationalism and make the article more grandiose than it really was. Sparkie...you hit the nail on the head. She did her job and did it well. And Joel...that would be interesting if the reporter was a woman. But we can wonder all we want and it won't change the outcome. It most likely would have been worded differently...the enfisis of gender could go either way. But, my eyes, I don't care what gender the pilot is as long as they have the coping skills to react to a situation with professionalism. Like I said before in a previous post...the entire crew assessed the conditions and reacted to the situation as a team. UAL has an exceptional training criteria for pilots and Flight Attendants. And they work together at the training facility...that's where the CRM comes in. So the whole crew is singing the same hymnal. It's runs like a well oiled machine.
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
... ,or how the story would read if the reporter a woman.
socalchatname714
SOP says to taxi to the gate.
socalchatname714
Please disregard the comment listed above. I placed it in the wrong thread.
levyharaivan
Every pilot's dream
btweston
btweston 5
One would think, but this guy flies supersonic bombers. Talking on the radios in a 737 might not be the coolest thing he's ever done. Probably up there, though.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 3
It probably was the coolest thing for him since he got to say United on the radio...
bbabis
Bill Babis 3
Since he had to work the flight, did he get his family's airfare paid? <grin>
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
LOL... He should have gotten his Flight Pay!
pilot62
If he had responded to th FO's interview with "I have 200 hundred hours in a Cessna and I'm not current", would she have sent him out of the cockpit ?
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 2
That didn't happen, so what difference does it make?
emilpudge
emilpudge 1
...I'll bet not...nor should have...unless a B-1 piloto showed up! ;-)
MANBOI
MANBOI 1
Similar scenarios have played out. Private pilots and flight attendants have helped land commercial flights in the same manner as the bomber pilot, they helped with the radios and checklists.
vhtje
Tim Evans 5
I nearly choked when I read, "she made the right judgment" - I mean, WTF? "She" was in command of the aircraft, who the hell is Captain Gongol to pass judgement on "her"?

The article reads like an ego piece to me. I bet if we read "her" account of the same day, we'd get a completely different story.

[This comment has been downvoted. Show anyway.]

canplanman
canplanman 9
thats the worst comment on this page
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 3
I agree. But remember, earlier on this page he identified himself as an "old military guy" - maybe very very very old and thinks like it's the 1930s. He's yet to move into the 21st century.
Doobs
Dee Lowry 2
One of the worst. Scotty, the military guy, made a doozie.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Same guy.
Doobs
Dee Lowry 2
I'll be damned "AW"! I think I should go get my annual check! And soon. Thanx for the jumpstart!
preacher1
preacher1 8
Apprehensive maybe, scared little girl no. She wouldn't have UAL right seat if she wasn't qualified. All of us, regardless of gender, get a little nervous when we do something the first time, especially if a totally unfamiliar situation. This was written by a military newspaper reporter highlighting the military man, when, in actuality, the FO was the boss. It was overlooked by some in the article, but she had command/control when he came into the cockpit and asked him what he flew, assessing his qualifications before she let him sit down.
sparkie624
sparkie624 5
Are you kidding me.. No wonder you got down voted.... She shot a visual approach and hand flew it... Note, she did not leave the gear at a sea wall, or any other wall... She made a great landing. Both did a great job in the cockpit and worked together as a team...
canplanman
canplanman 1
scott, sounds from your old man noodlin' that YOU would have been more 'scared' than she was if you'd known what was going on.

we can read between your lines too
dg1941
I would like to remind you that women have been just as capable in aviation as men. Some examples off the top of my head would include Stalin's Falcons (elite WWII Soviet women's fighter group), and Jacqueline Cochrane (female air racer and test pilot, largely noted for her flights in the F-104).
Doobs
Dee Lowry 2
Many F/A's are private pilots and or CFI's. Never underestimate the qualifications of a cabin crew member. And yes...they could assume the F/O position in a event such as this one.
mhlansdell00
I've been considering that and I think a non pilot or an under-qualified pilot might get more in the way than be of real help. The B-1 pilot would be familiar with big iron check lists and some of the gizmos and goulatches not in a light twin or a single engine. I may be wrong and the learning curve may be shorter than I'm thinking, but in some cases no help is better than poor help. As for training senior F/As, you already have passengers screaming about baggage fees. You're looking at considerable expense for a great number of people plus a salary push. Finally, using people other than those mandated by FARs exposes the airline to huge law suit risk. I'll do you a favor and not even touch on that risk.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
In an extreme emergency, I would think all the help available would be welcomed...anything to get that puppy safely on the ground.
mhlansdell00
Yes and no. I've been involved in a few and on more than one occasion wished I didn't have to provide OJT for the one helping me. In most cases when dealing with a pair of spare hands, it would have been more efficient to do it all myself. These were competent folks for the most part. They just had no experiebnce and I had to even tell them where to look . By the time I did all thet I could have done it myself and had time to spare. Reading a check list, OK, but don't adjust the flaps, gear, breakers or brakes.
Kismat
Commendable job!
gunfitr
At least he stood up and took the responsibility. He had to be a help. Didn't just sit there with his head in the sand like many others would have.
Topper1
W S Webb 2
All senior flight attendants should able to assume FO's position.
WithnailANDi
Yeah, if they triple the pay. BTW: there is no such thing as a "senior flight attendant"... there is only "the most senior flight attendant" on any flight. Flight attendants do not fly in regular groupings, we get mixed and matched, sometimes the grouping changes mid-trip. I've flown 4-day trips where the most "senior" FA was hired a year ago. Which makes your idea completely illogical, unless all FA's are trained to fly a plane, which makes them FO's and not FA's. And entitles them to the same pay. Which is WAY more than an FA gets paid. Basically, that's never going to happen.
mhlansdell00
You already have passengers screaming about baggage fees. You're looking at considerable expense for a great number of people plus a salary push. Finally, using people other than those mandated by FARs exposes the airline to huge law suit risk. I'll do you a favor and not even touch on that risk.
Doobs
Dee Lowry 2
My comment, Mark, was merely hypothetical. If in the event the cockpit crew were incapacitated and there were no non-revenue, off line, military or OMC's on board...look at the cabin crew for someone with some flight hours in their logbook. In that hypothetical situation...I wouldn't be looking at lawsuits...I would do my best to get that bird on the ground. And yes, I am a private pilot and a retired F/A. I know that I could land the bird if I had to.
mhlansdell00
The threat of suit is not fromm you. Even a hard landing might excite a pax or two if they were aware. The most realistic part of the article was the B-1 pilot and the F/O sizing each other up. . I'm all but sure what was going through her noggin was the question" am I making more work for myself or will this person help create a solution? The landing has to be a real grease job while less time consuming than had she done it alone.

It's a difficult call and unique to the situation. Are four hands always better than 2? Are 2 heads always better thanone? I'm not sure a SEL student pilot would be much, if any help since you would probably have to direct every hand move. The instrument panel alone would be daunting. A gas engine piper or Cessnahas little in common with a twin engine 737 with AP, AT and other goodies. The jury is still out for me. Sometimes just some else being there is a help.
Toes2
Gpa Tipton 2
35 yrs commercial Cap here_ maybe 9,000 or so on 737.
.
Have flown lots of legs solo due to brain-dead F/O.
.
Nonetheless_Official Attaboys to F/O & Military guy
.
btw_ None of the gals I flew with would give a sh8t about being awarded an Attaboy
instead of an AttaGirl_ They just liked being pilots.
genethemarine
Nice job sir!
preacher1
preacher1 1
This story was posted in another squawk yesterday and comments really started off wrong way. Looks like Daniel pulled it down and reposted. Very good read.
psseshadri
Very cool, man!!
tyketto
This was the KDSM-KDEN flight that made the emergency landing at KOMA. there was a LiveATC feed during this incident, and the clip of this is posted at their forums.
388thtfw
doug ogle 1
Cool,calm and collected.
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
Thanks for posting - good story.
rfsahae
rfsahae 1
Remember, he checked with his wife before he offered his assistance. His actions in the cockpit were consistent with his values.
mhlansdell00
Define what you mean. I suspect I know but just to be sure.
rfsahae
rfsahae 1
I meant that he is the kind of person who respected the input of his wife. The John Wayne stereotypical hero only pauses to kiss the "little woman" goodbye as he dashes off to heroic destiny. This guy consults her.

Maybe I'm reading too much into that ..... but I admit I might not double check with my husband before I offered my help.
preacher1
preacher1 1
I think she wore the pants and he felt right comfortable taking orders from a female. LOL
plupa
Paul Lupa 1
I see that Capt. Mark Gongol will be recognized in the next few weeks with the Air Force Commendation Medal.

http://www.airforcetimes.com/article/20140605/NEWS/306050070/Air-Force-pilot-who-helped-land-737-getting-Commendation-Medal
bjohnsonmn
Pretty great story. I often wonder what would happen if I were on one of my 90+ commercial flights and this happened...
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
Cool, and best wishes for the Captain.
georgegreen177
Let me amend that. The FO's job is "to fly the plane." Someone should have told ATC that the Captain was incapacitated.
BarbaraWoody
I am happy for the safe landing and pilot's recovery. Captain Gongol and First Officer, AWESOME JOB !!!
Joyschtik
Sal Milano 3
Duhhh. Ath the time the FO was the Captain! Jeeez
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
I think that she became PIC, assumed the duties of the Captain, but not the rank, privileges and paygrade. There was a temporary 3rd Lt who was cashiered from the Navy in 1812. A midshipman on a training cruise took his fatally injured Captain belowdecks without orders. The entire command structure was wiped out in a broadside, which made him the Commanding Officer. As CO absent his post, he was cashiered.
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
Not exactly true.. She was still the FO, but was definitely assumed the PIC position and did a good job of it.
preacher1
preacher1 4
I'd say she was Captain as she was the ranking UAL person on board besides being PIC.
dougrh
So why in an emergency with a only excepting nonrevenue pilot?
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 2
tvieno
So why the call for "non-revenue" pilots first? I understand military pilots being non-revenue but so are pilots who go for a joy ride on the weekend in their Cessna.
preacher1
preacher1 1
I think she was looking for DH UAL pilots or those belonging to another 121 first.
t140v
Man you guys are harsh.
HerrThor
HerrThor 1
haha, like in Airplane! movie!!!!
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
Don't get me started.... I loved that series... Even though it was a comical parody of John Wayne s movie "The High and Mighty"

“Good luck, we are all counting on you!"

“Good luck, we are all counting on you!"

“Good luck, we are all counting on you!"

“Good luck, we are all counting on you!"
n7224e
BC Hadley 3
...and don't call me "Shirley".
joelwiley
joel wiley 2
You jest.
emilpudge
emilpudge 1
...so would the original cap'n automatically lose his med cert after an in-air cardiac incident? Or would he be given't the opportunity to take and pass the stress tests etc to keep his med cert?
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 2
Is that a rhetorical question? I'm asking just because it was never stated the Captain had experienced an in-air cardiac incident. The reference was by Gongol: "Gongol immediately thought the pilot was suffering some serious cardiac trauma. " I believe that was the only cardiac reference in the article.
emilpudge
emilpudge 1
OK...rhetorically, if he had a certified M.I.??? I'm not trying to end anyone's career. :-)
Doobs
Dee Lowry 3
A 6 month recovery period has to elapse before certification. Pilots must obtain a special medical certificate and prove to the flight surgeon that duties can be performed without endangering public safety. Extra testing would be done, as well, to show that he/she are still safe to operate the aircraft.
yr2012
FO never thought to move over to the other side?
preacher1
preacher1 1
They apparently did after they got on the ground but the story says that he asked when he came in and she elected to say in the right seat.
socalchatname714
SOP says to remain in your current seat until after landing. After landing change seats only if necessary to taxi. In the case of the Airbus, the copilot can remain in their seat to the gate. There is a tiller on both sides. B-737 copilots must change seats to operate the tiller.
Doobs
Dee Lowry 1
No need for the tiller. Use your frinkin' feet to taxi!!
preacher1
preacher1 1
yeah but that tiller is nice and you know it, old man. LOL. BTW, I didn't just bail out on you guys. We lost power due to a bad storm Friday afternoon and just got it back about 15 minutes ago. later
mhlansdell00
I've never taxied a B-1. How does that work?
socalchatname714
Rudder pedals on Transports are not connected to the nose wheel, as they are on small aircraft. For example the rudders pedals on an Airbus A320 can move the nose wheel 6 degrees. in comparison, the tiller can move the nose wheel 97 degrees. The exact number of degrees varies with groundspeed. Taxiing a transport close to obstacles by rudder pedals alone is not possible. If you are unfamiliar with transports, use of wheel brakes to steer is for the most part useless as well. If the tiller is inop, you have to be towed.
KDSM
Tim Swift 0
Never knew this happened and I live here. Just read and searched FlighAware and found it was posted. Holy Mother of *** something out of a movie. Amazing. Can't imagine being in the plane and that coming over the loud speaker. Sounds Hell of a job Capt. Mark Gongol. I believe you were on that plane for a reason that day.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 0
So okay, here's a comment that's sure to send a bucketful of indignant comments: Good for her, job well done-I agree with all that. Thank the Lord she kept her head about her. However, she just did her job, didn't she. That's what she's there for. I've never been called a hero for doing my job.
preacher1
preacher1 1

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