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Accident Report Roundup: Time In Type

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“The number of hours in your logbook does not determine whether you’re a good pilot.” I’ve heard a variation of that phrase for decades, but in spite of the well-meaning advice, total time is still the measuring stick for pilots. A pilot with thousands of hours is assumed to be safe, and both his insurance premium and his reputation around the airport will probably reflect that assumption. But read through NTSB accident reports and you’ll quickly notice another measure of pilot proficiency is… (airfactsjournal.com) Altro...

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josephmonk3
Joseph Monk 1
The article makes a very good point about “time in type” being an often overlooked and way better measuring stick.

Would you fly with a guy with 1500 hours of single engine turboprop time but only 10 hours in a twin engine anything?
josephmonk3
Joseph Monk 1
Or (more related to time in type) would you fly with a dude that had 500 hours of twin time in a Baron but only 10 hours in a King Air 350?
bentwing60
bentwing60 2
If you are referring to the ADS KA350 event of late, and the copilot, it's how many of us that retired from flying Challengers, Gulfstreams, swept wing Citations and Lrjets got out of a Baron. I think the guy in the other seat was 71, hired the FO and definitely retired in a KA350.The last line is pseudo sarc., the rest was called payin your dues if non military or an early fence hanger without a rich daddy.
FrankBarber
Frank Barber 1
You have to remember your only as good as your next approach and landing. Flying requires discipline and focus. It also requires a survival instinct which controls risk taking. As an old aviator (we'll call him Capt. Smoky)told me once, always question whether what you are about to do the is the safest way to do it. He also said after someone tried to do something risky that ended tragically, "That's natures way of culling the herd", Nuf said.
Cadefoster
Cade foster -2
and every doctor is good....
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Somebody always has to graduate at the bottom of the class.

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