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A bird-damaged Southwest Boeing 737 returns to service in 48 hours

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A Southwest Boeing 737, which was damaged by a bird strike, returned to service just in two days thanks to the quick work by NVision Inc., a 3D non-contact optical scanning and measurement company. The rapid turnaround helped Southwest avoid the financial losses caused by grounding an aircraft for a long period. Bird strikes cost airlines billions of dollars each year. Not only because of the damage, but also the incurring capacity loss due to the grounded aircraft. In 2017, bird strikes caused… (airlinerwatch.com) Altro...

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chalet
chalet 2
Don't understad why they needed a special laser instrument to prepare the drawing of the rib. SWA should have all the manuals in the world including detailed drawings. Is there any
airframe manufacturer, MRO facility or airline proper manufacturing parts with 3D printing technology.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
Very Simple... RVSM... FAA Requirement to fly between FL280 and FM410... It is the law!
wingbolt
wingbolt 1
Since when has the wing become part of the RVSM critical area? I guess there could be a static port in the wing but I’m not familiar with one.
sparkie624
sparkie624 3
I did not see where it said Wing, but many bird strikes do damage in the RVSM Critical Area that require mapping... I must have missed when they said where the bird strike was... However, if you do the area mapping on the wing and get it exactly right, the plane will be more fuel efficient and save money there...
wingbolt
wingbolt 1
I agree with that. I would think lasers would be a very useful tool for a repair on any airfoil or flight control.
raleedy
ALLAN LEEDY 1
How do they even get a damaged aircraft to Ecuador and back in two days?
mkeflyer
mkeflyer 0
Ecuador? The company is in Southlake, TX.
sgbelverta
sharon bias 1
With so many aircraft grounded right now, Southwest has a real need to keep planes in the air. If this new technique speeds up the process of plane repair, then it's a good thing.
cmuncy
Chris Muncy 0
The takeaway on this should have been the laser scanning and part reconstruction.
sparkie624
sparkie624 -6
Why is this news... 2 Days for a Bird Strike... Must have been a Pterodactyl or something - Very few bird strikes require that much time to repair.... I consider this a non-news event!
Quirkyfrog
Robert Cowling -1
It's showing that Southwest is rushing planes back into the air after damage? *shrug*
sparkie624
sparkie624 -1
No News on that one... With them it is Rush Rush Rush... for them, 2 Days is an eternity!

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